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Our stakeholders have high expectations of CCEP, and want us to address many of today’s social and environmental challenges. Their views and priorities continue to play an integral role in the development of our sustainability action plan.

of litter and pollution, and the role we play in our communities. 

We value their insights, and we engage with them throughout the year to ensure their views are reflected in our sustainability strategy as it develops. Together, we identify areas for collaboration and set out our plans. Our partners have a vital role to play in our success; we want them to feel part of CCEP and share in our culture and behaviours.

This is Forward was developed following extensive consultation with over 100 of our key stakeholders – including governments, NGOs, customers, suppliers, as well as 12,000 consumers across six countries and more than 1,000 of our own employees.

As we work towards our sustainability goals, we continue to listen closely to our stakeholders’ concerns on the issues that matter most to them and our business – including the level of sugar in our drinks, the effects 

Drinks

Drinks

Who do we engage with?

We regularly speak with a range of customers, EU and national governments, regulators, NGOs and trade associations about this topic.

What are their concerns?

Stakeholders regularly speak to us about the need to reduce the amount of sugar and calories in our products, and make it easier for consumers to cut down on sugar by providing easy-to-understand product information and smaller packaging sizes. They also want to ensure that we have adopted responsible marketing and advertising practices, especially in relation to children.

How are we responding?

Reducing sugar: In 2016, we signed up to the UNESDA commitment to reduce added sugar in our drinks by 10% between 2015 and 2020. We continued to expand our portfolio in 2018, introducing 131 low and no calorie drinks to the market and offering new products to consumers. Since 2010, we’ve reduced the added sugar in our soft drinks by 15.8%, and by 11.1% since 2015. We have achieved our 10% target two years ahead of schedule. In 2019, we will continue our work on portfolio innovation and reformulation, and to increase availability and visibility of smaller pack sizes. We will also continue to increase our investment in marketing to raise consumer awareness of our range of low or no sugar options.

Introducing more choice: We’ve evolved our portfolio with more zero sugar options, including Monster Ultra and new Fanta flavours. We launched Fuze Tea, our popular ready-to-drink tea brand. We also launched Honest Coffee, our new range of premium ready-to-drink cold coffee products. We remain focused on our commitment to ensure that 50% of our sales come from low and no calorie drinks by 2025. In 2019, we will continue our work on portfolio innovation and reformulation, and to increase availability and visibility of smaller pack sizes. We will also continue to increase our investment in marketing to raise consumer awareness of our range of low or no sugar options. In 2018, 45% of the products we sold were low and no calorie.

Responsible marketing: We have a long-standing commitment never to market our products to children under 12 years of age.

Clearer labelling: To help consumers make an informed choice about their drinks we also provide nutritional information on all of our packaging. We have been using colour coded nutritional labelling in Great Britain since 2014 and in 2018, we began to trial this type of labelling in Belgium, France, Luxembourg and the Netherlands. We hope that this will make a positive contribution to the process of assessing different nutritional labelling options in Europe. 100% of our products have Reference Intake (RI) labelling. We’ve also introduced clearer portion-size labelling on every bottle over 500ml.

Packaging

Packaging

Who do we engage with?

Achieving a 100% collection rate for our packaging is a complex challenge. Our assessments show that achieving this target depends on the widespread adoption of well designed deposit return schemes or a significant improvement in packaging collection rates through local household collection schemes. In 2018, we continued to work with governments and industry partners including Fost Plus in Belgium, CITEO in France, Remondis and Interseroh in Germany, WRAP and Valpak in Great Britain, Infinitum in Norway, Ecoembes in Spain and Returpack in Sweden.

What are their concerns?

Stakeholders want us to ensure that our soft drinks packaging does not end up as litter, or in the oceans, that all of our packaging is fully recyclable or reusable, and that we support the circular economy by using recycled materials in our bottles and cans. Stakeholders would like to see us taking steps to move away from single use packaging, and invest in new packaging solutions. They would also like to see us use the power of our brands to ensure we encourage consumers to recycle.

How are we responding?

Recyclability: In 2018, 98% of our packaging was fully recyclable, and 21% of our packaging was refillable.

Using recycled and renewable materials: In 2018, 27.6% of the PET we used was recycled PET (rPET), and 3% of the PET we use was PlantPET.

Recycling: We’ve been working with local governments to improve the way in which packaging waste is collected and recycled in many of our markets. We also encourage recycling through clearer on-pack recyclability labelling and consumer campaigns. To ensure a reliable supply of high-quality rPET, we have invested in plastic reprocessing through a joint venture with Plastipak, Infineo Recycling, in France; and have a long term rPET supply agreement with CleanTech, a Plastipak facility in Lincolnshire in Great Britain.

We also want to move away from relying only on traditional mechanical recycling processes to clean, melt and reprocess plastic waste. We are now investing in enhanced recycling technologies. In 2018, we announced our new partnership and supply agreement with Loop Industries, Inc., a plastic reprocessing company. Loop’s depolymerisation technology will enable low value plastics waste, including ocean plastics, to be diverted, recovered and recycled into new, virgin-quality PET plastic which can be used again in our bottles.

Sustainable packaging innovation: We’ve pioneered new innovations in sustainable, re-usable packaging in conjunction with our Freestyle smart fountain dispensers. We’re also looking carefully at new zero-waste business models which provide an alternative to single use packaging. In May, we’ll begin working in Paris with Carrefour and Terracycle on Loop, a new circular shopping platform that will enable our iconic glass bottles to be enjoyed at home and then collected, cleaned, refilled and reused, alongside other durable packaging.

Consumer communication: Together with The Coca-Cola Company, we are working to directly encourage consumers to recycle, through clear on-pack labelling, as well as integrated consumer marketing campaigns, such as the A Bottle Love Story advertisement and our Across the Tracks commercial.

Society

Society

Who do we engage with?

Working with The Coca-Cola Company, we expanded our support for local community partnerships in 2018. We currently support a range of local programmes that empower young people, including WannaWork in Belgium, Passport to Employment in France, the Foundation of Integration in Germany, Reach Up in Great Britain, JINC in the Netherlands, GIRA Jóvenes in Spain and Mentor in Sweden.

What are their concerns?

Stakeholders want to ensure that we build a more diverse workforce, and inclusive culture across all areas of our business; and that our employees work in a safe, healthy environment. They also want to ensure that we make a proactive, positive, local economic contribution by increasing employability, building skills, offering job opportunities and supporting charitable and community causes.

How are we responding?

Gender-balanced leadership: We’ve set a target to achieve better gender balance in our management positions by 2025 - 40% women and 60% men. At the end of 2018, 35.6% of our management positions were held by women and 64.4% by men.

Diverse workforce and inclusive culture: We’re keen to recruit and nurture diverse perspectives and experiences. We've focused on gender diversity, as well as rolling out innovative programmes to become more inclusive of cultural and generational backgrounds. 2018 saw progress in hiring more female talent into senior positions. This progress is the result of a consistent focus on improving diversity in our recruitment process.

Safety: In 2018, we had a lost-time incident rate of 1.14. We are now working to establish a new cross-CCEP safety programme to continue to improve our performance.

Local employment: We have strong relationships with the local communities in which we operate, providing employment for 23,300 people across our territories.

Community investment: We’re increasing our employee volunteering and supporting local community partnerships, with a special focus on youth initiatives. In 2018, we contributed €5 million, or 0.41% of our profit before tax, to community activities. In addition, our employees dedicated 11,955 volunteer hours to support the work of our national charity partners, local community groups and other good causes. In November 2018, to mark the first anniversary of our This is Forward strategy, we launched a new volunteering policy that enables all CCEP employees to dedicate up to two paid working days a year to volunteer for a charity or cause of their choice.

Water

Water

Who do we engage with?

We work closely with suppliers, local municipalities and NGOs such as WWF and SEO/Birdlife.

What are their concerns?

Stakeholders want us to protect the local watersheds where we source the water we use in our drinks; and to ensure that we are using water as efficiently as possible. They also want us to address the water impacts in our supply chain - particularly our ingredients and raw materials, and to replenish the water we use in areas of water stress.

How are we responding?

Protect: All of our facilities have undertaken Source Vulnerability Assessments and have Source Water Protection Plans in place.

Water use: In 2018, we used an average of 1.61 litres of water to make one litre of product. This is a reduction of 11.25% since 2010.

Replenish: Together with The Coca-Cola Company, we continue to replenish the water we use in areas of water stress in partnership with local NGOs and community groups. In 2018, we managed 15 community-based water replenishment projects in Western Europe, enabling us to replenish a volume equivalent to 141% of the water we used in our products in areas of water stress.

Climate

Climate

Who do we engage with?

We work with stakeholders such as The Prince of Wales’s Corporate Leaders Group, and NGOs such as Ecodes in Spain to reduce our direct greenhouse gas emissions. We engage with the Science Based Targets initiative (SBTi), to set science-based targets that are in line with the Paris Climate Change Agreement. We are also working with suppliers to reduce greenhouse gas emissions resulting from the value chains of the drinks we produce.

What are their concerns?

Stakeholders want us to set greenhouse gas reduction targets which are aligned to the needs of science, reducing emissions to a 2-degree scenario, in line with the global targets set by the Paris Climate Change Agreement. They want us to set targets which not only look at our own operations, but also across our entire value chain. Stakeholders also want us to align to the RE100 initiative, and source only renewable electricity.

How are we responding?

Carbon reductions: Since 2010 we’ve reduced the absolute carbon footprint of our core operations by 50.6%, and by 29.7% per litre (g CO2e/litre), across our entire value chain.

Science-based targets: Our new climate strategy and carbon reduction commitments are in line with the 2015 Paris Agreement and have been validated by the Science Based Targets initiative. 

Renewable energy: We are signatories of RE100, making a commitment to purchase 100% renewable energy for our direct operations by 2020. In 2018, 100% of the electricity we purchased was from renewable sources.

Supply Chain

Supply chain

Who do we engage with?

We work with NGOs, our suppliers and industry organisations like the Sustainable Agriculture Initiative (SAI)Rainforest Alliance, and UTZ.

What are their concerns?

Stakeholders want us to be transparent about our supply chain, and provide assurance that they are free of child labour, forced labour or modern slavery, respect human rights, and support local livelihoods. In particular, they want to ensure that our key agricultural ingredients are sourced sustainably and do not damage the environment.

How are we responding?

Supplier Guiding Principles: In 2018, 91% of our spend was with suppliers which are covered by our Supplier Guiding Principles (SGPs).

Sustainable ingredient sourcing: 100% of our suppliers are committed to complying with our Sustainable Agriculture Guiding Principles (SAGPs) by 2020. We continue to work with third-party certification bodies (including SAI Platform, UTZ and FSC/PEFC) to ensure that our suppliers provide agricultural ingredients that comply with our SAGPs. In 2018, 88% of our sugar was sourced from suppliers which comply with our SAGPs.

Human Rights: We continue to embed human rights within our supply chain, in conjunction with The Coca-Cola Company, through our SGPs and SAGPs. We publish an annual response to the UK’s Modern Slavery Act, and have recently responded to Know the Chain, a benchmark regarding forced labour risks within global supply chains.

CCEP reviews risks annually through its risk assessment process. During 2017, we expanded this process to also include the risk of modern slavery within our supply chain. In October 2018, we hosted an internal human rights workshop with cross-functional participation from senior managers across our business, including support and engagement from our Executive Leadership Team. We also benefitted from input and advice from key external stakeholders including UN OHCHRInstitute of EmployersKnow The Chain and industry peers. Our aim was to understand what human rights means for our own operations and our supply chain.

As a result, we committed to conduct a Human Rights Risk Assessment for CCEP in 2019 based on the salient issues identified during the workshop. The risk assessment process in Q1 2019 included interviews with senior leaders across the business, followed by a risk assessment workshop to develop more detailed action plans on key issues. We identified what human rights means for CCEP, namely protecting people’s inherent and indivisible rights and freedoms both in our own operations and in our value chain; fair and equal treatment of people (no discrimination) and treating people with dignity and doing no harm to others. Throughout this process, there has been clear acknowledgment that human rights issues can and do present themselves in our own day-to-day operations in Western Europe and not just in the extended global value chain. During 2019, we will also deliver human rights training for our procurement function.

Our Stories

Open

Open

The Netherlands

In November 2018, we held the second of our OPEN series of stakeholder discussions in the Netherlands. Over two weeks, we held 25 OPEN sessions with a total of 600 key stakeholders from a range of backgrounds including customers, journalists, students and non-governmental organisations (NGOs). During the event we talked about the progress we had made on each of our This is Forward commitments and the challenges and opportunities we faced over the year. 

Customer engagement

Belgium & Spain

In 2018, we hosted in Belgium “Tomorrow is Now” and in Spain “We Move”, a series of workshops with our main customers across both countries. During the sessions we discussed our strategy to expand our portfolio to become a total beverage company, and the progress we have made so far. The effects of litter and pollution are a key area of concern for our customers, so our discussions also focused on our packaging commitments and progress.

Germany

We also hosted an event at our customer collaboration centre (KOLab) in Brussels for our customers in Germany. The discussions focused on sugar reduction across our portfolio. In 2018, we continued to organise stakeholder roundtables with a focus on “Packaging & Recycling”, “Sugar and Ingredients” and “Sustainability and Digitalization”. 

Climate

Supplier engagement

CCEP-wide

In March 2018, we held a meeting in Berlin with our key suppliers to discuss our sustainability strategy. The event brought together key supply partners across all areas of our business and covered many sustainability issues, with a particular focus on sustainable packaging solutions, water and energy.

Stakeholders

Investor and analyst engagement

CCEP-wide 

In September 2018, we hosted a capital markets event for institutional investors and analysts in Wiesbaden, Germany. The event was an opportunity to reflect on how far we have come, but also to consider the €30 billion retail value growth opportunity in our markets between now and 2028. During the event, we set out the two pillars of our long-term growth plan – diversifying our portfolio and packaging and transforming our route to market.

 

Employee engagement

Great Britain

In 2018, we established a Sustainability Champions Network to empower colleagues from all areas of the Great Britain business unit to both actively contribute to our implementation of This is Forward and to share our sustainability story. We are committed to encouraging participation through this inclusive network from a representative group of people from across all areas and levels of the business, encouraging our Sustainability Champions to actively contribute and share their ideas.